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Emiliano Zapata Spoke and Wrote in Nahuatl

Part of a message written in Nahuatl to supporters of the Mexican Revolution sent from the headquarters of the Liberation Army of the South in Tlatizapán, Morelos, on April 27, 1918 by its Commander in Chief, Emiliano Zapata:
 
“…Axcan ocachi que me aic monequi ti mo zepampalehuizque ica nochi to yolo ihuan ica nochi totoyoquiliztli itech inon huei tequitl de necetiliztli mahuiztic, huelneli de necate tlen qui pehualtihque netehuiliztle tlen qui yolóhpia chipahuac nin pehualoni ihuán ámo qui poloa nin neltocaliz de cuali-inemiliz…”

“…Now more than ever we need to help each other with all our heart and with all our efforts in this great task of unity, which is truly the work of those who got into the fight, to keep their heart clean with those principles and to not lose faith in a life of respect…”

“…Ahora más que nunca hay necesidad de que nos ayudemos entre nosotros con todo corazón y con todo nuestro empeño en esa gran tarea de unificación digna, que es verdaderamente la tarea de los que se metieron a la lucha, que conservan limpia en su corazón esa empresa y que no pierden la fe en una vida de respeto…”

via comoespinademaguey

Emiliano Zapata Spoke and Wrote in Nahuatl

Part of a message written in Nahuatl to supporters of the Mexican Revolution sent from the headquarters of the Liberation Army of the South in Tlatizapán, Morelos, on April 27, 1918 by its Commander in Chief, Emiliano Zapata:

“…Axcan ocachi que me aic monequi ti mo zepampalehuizque ica nochi to yolo ihuan ica nochi totoyoquiliztli itech inon huei tequitl de necetiliztli mahuiztic, huelneli de necate tlen qui pehualtihque netehuiliztle tlen qui yolóhpia chipahuac nin pehualoni ihuán ámo qui poloa nin neltocaliz de cuali-inemiliz…”

“…Now more than ever we need to help each other with all our heart and with all our efforts in this great task of unity, which is truly the work of those who got into the fight, to keep their heart clean with those principles and to not lose faith in a life of respect…”

“…Ahora más que nunca hay necesidad de que nos ayudemos entre nosotros con todo corazón y con todo nuestro empeño en esa gran tarea de unificación digna, que es verdaderamente la tarea de los que se metieron a la lucha, que conservan limpia en su corazón esa empresa y que no pierden la fe en una vida de respeto…”

via comoespinademaguey

The Oscar Is Mexican: Academy Award Statuette Modeled After Emilio ‘El Indio’ Fernández

The story behind the Academy Award’s Oscar statuette is itself one fit for the movies.

It starts in the 1920s during the Mexican Revolution. Emilio Fernández was studying in Mexico’s military college when he dropped out to take up arms and support the revolutionary cause of Adolfo de la Huerta.

Forced into exile, a defeated De la Huerta left Mexico in 1924 to open a music school in Hollywood. A less lucky Fernández was captured and sentenced to 20 years in prison. However, he was only in jail for 8 months when he managed to escape. It is said he used dynamite to blow himself out of jail. He soon joined back up with De la Huerta in Los Angeles where he began working as an extra in Hollywood films.

It was in 1928 that friend and fellow Mexican Dolores del Río approached Fernández with the proposition of being the nude model for the Academy Award.

Fernández was modest and unwilling at first, but ultimately took the job, and is now forever tied to the Academy Award and its statuette, the “Oscar.”

Fernández eventually returned to Mexico where he wrote, directed and starred in dozens of films, receiving critical acclaim for several of them.

In 1946, his masterpiece, “María Candelaria,” was the first Mexican film to be screened at the Cannes Film Festival of France. It won the Grand Prix prize for best feature film. And in 2002, the U.S. Library of Congress named “La Perla,” which he co-wrote and directed with John Steinbeck, to its National Film Registry.

In Mexico, Emilio Fernández was known as “El Indio,” Spanish for “The Indian,” a tribute to his Indigenous heritage and subject of many of his films.

Fernández’s place in Mexican cinema is well known and highly regarded, but his role in American film history as both an actor and muse for the ultimate Hollywood award has been largely forgotten.

As you watch the Academy Awards ceremony Sunday night, remember the story of how a young man in Mexico went from fighting in a revolution to being the model for the “Oscar.” To El Indio Fernández!

This an updated version of a post we first published February 26, 2012.

The Oscar Is Mexican: Academy Award Statuette Modeled After Emilio ‘El Indio’ Fernández

The story behind the Academy Award’s Oscar statuette is itself one fit for the movies.

It starts in the 1920s during the Mexican Revolution. Emilio Fernández was studying in Mexico’s military college when he dropped out to take up arms and support the revolutionary cause of Adolfo de la Huerta.

Forced into exile, a defeated De la Huerta left Mexico in 1924 to open a music school in Hollywood. A less lucky Fernández was captured and sentenced to 20 years in prison. However, he was only in jail for 8 months when he managed to escape. It is said he used dynamite to blow himself out of jail. He soon joined back up with De la Huerta in Los Angeles where he began working as an extra in Hollywood films.

It was in 1928 that friend and fellow Mexican Dolores del Río approached Fernández with the proposition of being the nude model for the Academy Award.

Fernández was modest and unwilling at first, but ultimately took the job, and is now forever tied to the Academy Award and its statuette, the “Oscar.”

Fernández eventually returned to Mexico where he wrote, directed and starred in dozens of films, receiving critical acclaim for several of them.

In 1946, his masterpiece, “María Candelaria,” was the first Mexican film to be screened at the Cannes Film Festival of France. It won the Grand Prix prize for best feature film. And in 2002, the U.S. Library of Congress named “La Perla,” which he co-wrote and directed with John Steinbeck, to its National Film Registry.

In Mexico, Emilio Fernández was known as “El Indio,” Spanish for “The Indian,” a tribute to his Indigenous heritage and subject of many of his films.

Fernández’s place in Mexican cinema is well known and highly regarded, but his role in American film history as both an actor and muse for the ultimate Hollywood award has been largely forgotten.

As you watch the Academy Awards ceremony Sunday night, remember the story of how a young man in Mexico went from fighting in a revolution to being the model for the “Oscar.” To El Indio Fernández!

This an updated version of a post we first published February 26, 2012.

Periódico Regeneración Nace el 7 de Agosto de 1900

“Durante los primeros cuatro meses estuvimos silenciosos como una tumba respecto de Díaz y sus crímenes” – Enrique Flores Magón

El 7 de agosto de 1900 se publicó el primer número del periódico Regeneración de los Hermanos Flores Magón. Sería el medio de expresión del movimiento denominado  Magonismo y el cual en sus inicios denunciaba las condiciones políticas y sociales del Porfiriato.

Sus ideas los llevarían en múltiples ocasiones a la cárcel, en 1902 el gobierno dictó una orden que prohibía la publicación de artículos firmados por Ricardo Flores Magón. Regeneración fue publicado en diferentes épocas, siendo la última y como semanario revolucionario la comprendida entre el 3 de septiembre de 1910 y 16 de marzo de 1918.

Lea más en HistoriaMexico

Periódico Regeneración Nace el 7 de Agosto de 1900

“Durante los primeros cuatro meses estuvimos silenciosos como una tumba respecto de Díaz y sus crímenes” – Enrique Flores Magón

El 7 de agosto de 1900 se publicó el primer número del periódico Regeneración de los Hermanos Flores Magón. Sería el medio de expresión del movimiento denominado Magonismo y el cual en sus inicios denunciaba las condiciones políticas y sociales del Porfiriato.

Sus ideas los llevarían en múltiples ocasiones a la cárcel, en 1902 el gobierno dictó una orden que prohibía la publicación de artículos firmados por Ricardo Flores Magón. Regeneración fue publicado en diferentes épocas, siendo la última y como semanario revolucionario la comprendida entre el 3 de septiembre de 1910 y 16 de marzo de 1918.

Lea más en HistoriaMexico

Pancho Villa Attacks Columbus, New Mexico 

In the early morning of March 9, 1916, General Francisco “Pancho” Villa and between 500-1,000 of his cavalry troops invaded the United States, attacking a military camp in the small town of Columbus, New Mexico.

In retaliation, on March 14, 1916, the United States Army launched The Pancho Villa Expedition with the mission to kill or capture General Villa.

US troops remained on Mexican soil until February 7, 1917. Villa was never killed nor captured.

The site in Columbus, New Mexico, where General Villa and his troops invaded the United States, is now Pancho Villa State Park.


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Pancho Villa Attacks Columbus, New Mexico

In the early morning of March 9, 1916, General Francisco “Pancho” Villa and between 500-1,000 of his cavalry troops invaded the United States, attacking a military camp in the small town of Columbus, New Mexico.

In retaliation, on March 14, 1916, the United States Army launched The Pancho Villa Expedition with the mission to kill or capture General Villa.

US troops remained on Mexican soil until February 7, 1917. Villa was never killed nor captured.

The site in Columbus, New Mexico, where General Villa and his troops invaded the United States, is now Pancho Villa State Park.

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